Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘plant roots’

I did it!  I jumped for a “garden” here at Horizon House! Actually, it’s a plot that cannot be gardened in the usual sense.  It has roots from a Japanese Maple that we like a lot.  We don’t want to cut out the roots, as we’d lose the tree!  Drucilla, who had that plot, was moved to a place where she could actually dig.  Now, what to do with that useless plot???

Just cover it with mulch?  Why not place some pots there?

We had just cleaned up the three (3) decks so they could be resurfaced, which meant that all the pots sitting on those decks had to be removed.  There was ample time for folks to claim their pots.  I didn’t really want to buy new pots, when all those unclaimed pots were just sitting in the storage room.  So I picked out a few, and pressed them into service!img_5586

Betty had a pot that she was not going to be able to use.  It had some geraniums in it.  I asked if I could use it in my “new garden”.  She consented.  At first I was going to remove the geraniums, but then decided to keep them.  I would lay that container on it’s side, and put the two other pots around it.

Charlie and August helped me bimg_5590y moving heavy pots, and filling them with wonderful new soil.  I trimmed back the geraniums and am hoping they will reach for the sun and begin to grow in that direction.  They will hopefully provide some color.  I planted drought resistant plants (mostly succulents) in all three pots.  I’m hoping they will require very little care, and after they settle in, should look pretty nice!img_5593

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

What requirements does a plant have to have in order to be considered “drought tolerant”?

It’s interesting because sometimes you can tell a drought tolerant plant by just looking at it.  Maybe the leaves are almost nonexistent, as in an evergreen with it’s oh, so narrow leaves (needles).  Some evergreens also have a pine-359845__180waxy substance that helps keep the moisture from being lost.

You’ll notice that there are plants, like silver sage, whose leaves are covered with tiny little hairs.  Those hairs grasp moisture and hold onto it.  sageOr how about plants with very deep root systems?  They dig deep to  find moisture well below the surface of the soil.  Or on the opposite side of the spectrum, those plants with roots very close to the surface to grab all the barest of rain drops.

Generally, plants that are native to dryer climates like the Mediterranean, the American West, central Asia, and southern Africa will do quite well.  A number of our herbs, used in Italian cooking are from that area and hence do well in drought condition gardens.  Think about Rosemary, Thyme, Oregano and Sage.

But, there are other things to remember about drought tolerance. 37350208-old-garden-scoop-on-root-and-soil-of-flowers-top-view Even a drought tolerant plant needs to have plenty of water as it is planted and trying to establish itself.  Do not ignore any newly placed plant.  Those little rootlets will dry out very quickly, and stunt, or kill your plant.  Keep any new plant well hydrated until it’s well established.  Also, we have to remember that although the plants are drought TOLERANT, that doesn’t say they are able to live through extended periods of severe drought.  If that happens, even the most drought tolerant of plants will need a little drink.  Here is a site that will help you deal with an extended period of drought.

These plants should have well drained, and organic rich soil.  img_5553This is a wonderful advantage we have here at Horizon House.  We have raised beds, with wonderful, rich soil and good drainage (especially after our new drainage systems have been installed).

One of the most important things you can do to support your plants is to provide as much mulch as possible.  It will keep the ground cool and hold that moisture in.  It will also reduce the number of weeds that will compete for water.  In our garden beds, weeds are not a huge problem, but it is worth thinking about.

Our drip irrigation system is wonderful.  It provides water to the roots, rather than to the air where it dries out too quickly.  It also is activated in the early morning, which is the very best time, as the heat of the day(which might dry it out) has not been reached as yet.

Here’s a connection to my old blog (North Country Maturing Gardener) from New Hampshire that talks about Xeriscaping or the use of drought tolerant landscaping.  It talks about many of the ideas we are dealing with here today.

Read Full Post »

I’ve decided to have my blog relate to all of my GARDENING friends here at Horizon House in Seattle, WA.  If others want to join in, that’s great…WELCOME!

One of our Garden Committee members suggested I forward an article from a local gardening center about “Fall Planting”.  After reading it, I thought, “Hey, I can be more explicit about this topic and aim it toward the needs of our 3 gardening levels!”  So, that’s what I will now do.

So, give these a try.

Fertilize your perennials and shrubsimg_3890 it will help them make
it through the winter.

To keep your bulbs in top-notch condition while giving you lots of flowers, scatter a 5-10-20 fertilizer on top of the ground above them.

Stop pruning shrubs. Pruning will encourage new growth, which should be avoided. Any new stuff will be nipped by frost which is NOT good for the plant!

If you haven’t divided your herbaceous perennials, such as daylilies, irises, hostas and peonies, get it done soon. Remember the soil is still nice and warm even if the temperature drops at night. It allows the roots time to settle in and establish themselves before winter sets in! This is what makes fall such a good time to plant!

Allowing hips to form on your roses tells the plant to harden off for winter. IMG_2212.jpgSo, you should probably stop picking the blooms for the table!

Water your peonies and shrubs heavily. It may have to last
until spring.

Dig up your gladiola, dahlia and tuberous begonia corms.

Poinsettias should now be put in their dark corner for at least 16 hours each day in order to set up their bracts to be colorful by Christmas time.

IMG_0044.jpgStart preparing your indoor plants to come back inside. You need to be sure they don’t have insects hiding anywhere. You also want to clean off the pots, especially if they were sunken into the soil for their summer sojourn!

BULBS! PLANT THEM!

I hope you will enjoy following along.  If you’d like to be notified every time I add to this blog, just go to  the “Follow the Transplanted Gardener” to the right of this message, and click on the button that says “Follow”.  It’s that simple!

Read Full Post »

Almost all our problems here at the Horizon House gardens involve water…in one way or another.IMG_0371

There’s a leak creating a flood; the hose has popped rendering water unavailable; the hose nozzle is broken; a spray emits from the sprayer going in the wrong direction, creating a very wet gardener; there’s water leaking across the deck under the planters creating a slippery spot, which is NOT good in a retirement community where some folks are challenged with walking; we need more folks to water pots and planters that are not individually cared for by an assigned gardener; there is the usual vacationer who either forgets, or neglects to get their garden cared for in their absence.  The list goes on and on.  All the gardeners know JUST what I’m talking about.

So, we can’t do without it, and yet sometimes we just get too much…or we get it in the wrong place.  WATER   We can’t live without it, and sometimes we can’t live with it.  Our plants?  Well, they need it, but administered correctly!

Why do they need it?  If they don’t have it, the little rootlets will dry up, no sustenance will get to the leaves, stems and trunk, and then?  A dead plant.

Here is a wonderful site that explains all the why’s and hows of water and your plants.  It comes from the University of Arizona Extension Service.

It tells about mulch.  It tells about over, and under watering, and the effects those will have on your plants.  It explains WHERE to water, and how much.  It’s worth a visit.

WATER is SO CRITICAL to every growing thing.  Without it, our gardens would be very sad places.  There certainly are plants that don’t require very much hydration.  Those are the ones we should try to get into our gardens.  Water is something we seem to be squandering.    It is important that our families have enough drinking water…but it is also important that we have food.  Every thing we consume is loaded with water.  So, almost everything in and  on our planet needs it.  It behooves us to use it sparingly, yet in such a way that it supports life-ours AND that of our plants.

I address water in my book as well.  It appears in the calendar section as well as in numerous stories.  It’s a very important aspect of gardening.  The book also addresses snow and ice and it’s affects on your garden.  Of course, in Seattle, we are not troubled too much with ice and snow, but it’s all part of the big picture.

Read Full Post »

IMG_2314Last week we went to Swanson’s for a talk on Gardening for Seniors.  Not only did we have a good talk on Gardening for Seniors, we had a chance to have a delightful lunch and then wander into the Nursery to purchase all kinds of plants!

I thought it would be good to review the things we heard about.  I will do that here.  I have also taken the liberty of adding a few of my own observations that I think could be most helpful.  Here they are:

THE SOIL & POTTING TECHNIQUES
⁃    You can use HUGE packing pearls to take up room in large pots so you don’t need so much soil.  It will also make the pot lighter to move around.  Remember to use a permeable material to separate the soil from the pearls.
⁃    You should transplant pots every 3-5 years.
⁃    If you need help re-potting, Swanson’s does do that.
⁃    You should always have a hole in the pot for drainage.
⁃    A dolly under a pot is VERY helpful for moving it!
⁃    Use ergonomic tools!  They are much better for arthritic and “tired” hands.

FERTILIZING
⁃    Osmacote is wonderful for perennials
⁃    We talked about the numbers on the fertilizer.  They can be confusing, so here’s an easy way to remember what you are looking for.
⁃    N-P-K  (nitrogen-phophorus-potassium) is what they translate to…the numbers mean the percentage of each of those ingredients found in the fertilizer.
⁃    N-or nitrogen is critical for foliage growth.  i.e. fertilizer for grass has a HIGH first number or nitrogen content.  Don’t use too much of this on your flowering plants, as it will stimulate foliage at the expense of flowers!
⁃    P-Phophorus-is necessary for the roots and flowers. (Think bulbs and rhizomes, as well as annuals) A high middle number (P) is GOOD for flowering plants. (Rolf, our speaker, suggested Bloom Booster (10-52-10) for your annuals.)
⁃    K-Potassium builds the entire plant helping it become sturdy and healthy overall.
⁃    All of these should be scratched into the soil to be sure it can be absorbed readily by the roots.IMG_2327

INSECTS
⁃    Slugs-You can run a copper band around the garden.
⁃    A recipe I have used in New England is combining 9 parts water to 1 part common household ammonia and spray it on your vulnerable plants just before dark. When the slugs hit this, they will dissolve!
⁃    I also recommend spreading diatomaceous earth around those plants.
⁃    For Roses you can spray with Neem Oil in the spring and fall.
⁃    Aphids will drown easily so spraying them with water every 8 days for a few weeks should do the trick.
⁃    Mealy Bugs and Spider Mites should be treated with Insecticidal soap.

Read Full Post »

Yesterday, I was given a few pieces of an aloe that is overtaking a friend’s windowsill.  When I brought it in, my husband wondered where I might be putting this new acquisition.  I guess, first into a pot!  I understand by my reading, that they can dry out a bit before planting, although my friend propagates her’s by putting the stems in water to root.  So, which method shall I try?  I’ve got 3 of them, so I guess I could try both methods and see which works best!IMG_2434

Here is a photo of my newest orphans…about to settle into their new home!

Read Full Post »

Since my last posting, I’ve gotten a few more good ideas about blocking that hole in the bottom of your pots so you don’t lose the soil.

As you recall, in the “good old days” we used to put shards of clay (pots) in the bottom of our pots to keep the soil from running out.  Well, why use up all that potting space if you can do something more efficient?  It would be better to provide as much space as possible for the roots of your plant.  That would mean  you don’t have to re-pot quite as often, and we all like less work, right?

How about coffee filters; a piece of nylon stocking, a piece of sock, T-shirt; or of course, just a piece of paper toweling?  Let’s get creative!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Joke for today

A NEW JOKE EVERY DAY

Liam's Travels

Not all those who wander are lost

The Sharing Gardens

A Master Gardener from Northern New England moves to the Pacific Northwest. Here are accumulated gardening experiences encountered along the way.

Hot Saucers Ultimate

Hamilton College's Ultimate Frisbee Team

This Veggie Life

A Vegetarian | Nature Lifestyle Blog

A Transplanted Gardener

A Master Gardener from Northern New England moves to the Pacific Northwest. Here are accumulated gardening experiences encountered along the way.

Karen Whalen

A Writer Sharing Her One in a Million Journey with Adrenal Cancer

Camp Merrowvista

The official blog of Merrowvista summer camp

G Chek Flys!

My Photography and Aviation Interests

Storyshucker

A blog full of humorous and poignant observations.

Wausau News

Health and Freedom News

Lyons Bonsai

A Novice Bonsai journey in Ireland

A Bridge to the Garden

Seminars for Gardeners about Gardening