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Archive for the ‘Peonies’ Category

The irises are LOVELY right now.  Some of them are VERY heavy and really need to be propped up.  There are a few that have had their tops nibbled off by some critter, or crow perhaps.  Oh, well!

As you can see by the pictures I took this morning as I cruised through the Horizon House gardens, those irises are really showing off!

 

I went from deck to deck, to see all the majesty our gardeners have wrought.  If you haven’t gone down to look, you really should!

The C deck even has some veggies, with our little friend Peter in it’s midst!

The D Level gardens are popping as well!  And the bees are happy!

Going onto the Secret Garden, there are always surprises to be found!

What do you think?  Are the gardens ready for “June In Our Gardens”?

In June the Garden Committee gives a SPECIAL invitation for everyone to visit the gardens.  Every day, we will have tours, activities, lectures, trips, parties, lunches brought to enjoy together, and just a jolly time outside.  The Garden Committee hopes you’ll participate and join us for as many activities as you can.

Remember we not only garden for us, we garden for YOU!

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MAY GARDENING CHORES FOR THE

PACIFIC NORTHWEST

Know your Horticultural Zone.  Find it here!

  • Tulips should be dead-headed(remove spent flower)100_0120
  • The grass can be mowed when it reaches 3-4 inches (sorry, but it IS that time again!)
  • Hold off mulching until the soil is warm, or you’ll just keep the cold in!
  • You can now plant lettuce, beans, corn and carrots right in the soil.
  • They say that tomatoes can be planted when the lilacs bloom. Hmmm…  You might sprinkle a teaspoon of Epsom salts into the hole where they go to provide magnesium.  44252830-beautiful-tomatoes-in-the-summer-garden-natural-conceptRemember that smaller plants will establish better than the larger ones, so go for the smaller potted plants rather than the big ones.  Be aware that temperatures MAY drop on some nights, so be prepared to  protect your seedings.
  • Marigolds, zinnias and even nasturtiums are good to plant in and around your vegetables as well as the flower beds. They repel insects!
  • You can begin to plant gladiolas at 2 week intervalsimages.duckduckgo
  • You can fertilize any bulbs that are up.
  • Stake your peonies before they get too big.  This web page about peonies is from Vermont.  However, the explanations are wonderful and the pictures are very helpful!IMG_6291
  • Insert stakes for dahlias and other bulbs at planting time to avoid spearing tubers which might happen after growth has started.
  • Harvest rhubarb by grabbing it at the base of the stalk and pulling firmly away from the crown, twisting just a bit. Be sure to throw the leaves into the compost as they are poisonous!images.duckduckgo
  • You can prune your spring blooming shrubs just as soon as the flowers have faded.

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Know your Horticultural Zone.  Find it here!

I have loaded this post with links you should find helpful.  Be sure to click on them for all kinds of extra information.  I have used Extension, or Horticultural sites, so you shouldn’t be troubled with any advertising when you go there.

  • This is a good time to get that soil tested. Then there will be time to amend it before the season gets into full swing!
  • Edge your flower beds to rid yourself of invading lawn rhizomes. Toss the edgings from this into the compost.
  • Rebar, the steel bars used to reinforce concrete and masonry, make great garden stakes. They’re inexpensive, strong and durable and they come in a variety of sizes. You can find them in any building supply store.
  • Start up your lawn mower so you know it doesn’t need a trip to the repair shop before grass cutting time. Also be sure the blades are SHARP.
  • Sharpen your other tools while you are at it!
  • The lawn would appreciate a good fertilizing at this time.
  • Avoid working in the garden unless the soil breaks up in your hand if you squeeze a lump of it.
  • Turn your compost 
  • Hummingbirds Be sure the feeders are cleaned every time you refill them.  The food should be 1 part sugar to 4 parts water.  Bring to a boil and cool before putting into the feeder.
  • Sow peas in the ground as soon as the frost is gone
  • Continue with the tree pruning. Get rid of dead and diseased limbs
  • As soon as your shrubs are done blooming, prune them as well.
  • You can prune your berry bushes-check a reference.
  • Rhubarb can be divided.  They are almost impossible to kill, so don’t worry about hurting them.
  • This is a good time to pull out weed trees and old bramble branches. They tend to yank out easily because the soil is still soft and moist.
  • Remove mulch from strawberries
  • Put your trellis systems and peony supports into place.
  • Pansies and other cold weather annuals can now be planted outside.
  • It is the time to divide and plant perennials as well as cutting any of last years remaining growth away. It’s known as good housekeeping in the garden!
  • If you have any bare root plants going into the garden, soak them overnight before planting. Also be sure to trim off any super long or broken roots.
  • If you winter mulch your garden beds, begin to remove mulch when forsythia and daffodils bloom.
  • Try planting scented flowers near walks!

I hope you’ll check out my book A Year In My New England Garden, which has a similar calendar along with vignettes of my gardening experiences in New England.  Your purchase of this book will help me cover my blogging costs.  It is inexpensive, and should be fun, helpful and make a great gift for gardening friends.

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PEONIES

Today when I walked around our gardens, I saw a number of peonies in various gardens.  BUT, only Drucilla’s had a cage (support) in place.

This is the time to get your peonies supported.

The flower stems which are already forming, are LONG and HEAVY!  They need support, or the first rain will have them lying on the ground.  Then the flowers are so heavy, they never recover to rise again.

If you are unsure of what a support looks like, IMG_6291you can use a tomato cage, or other means of holding those branches up.  Here’s a photo of Drucilla’s peony.

By putting the supports on now, you won’t break the branches.  It allows the plant to grow into and around the cage.  This way you will hardly even be aware that the cage is there.

If you wait until it is larger, you risk breaking the flowering stems or the branches, plus it looks “forced”.

Here is a website I found which gives additional information for peonies in Washington State.  You might find something particularly interesting here.

While I was cruising around, I found Jane doing a little gardening!  Talk about throwing yourself into the task at hand!  GO JANE!IMG_6290

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