Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘herbs’ Category

A dream???  I think I fell asleep sometime in the beginning of November, and just woke up!  Sorry I’ve been gone so long.  It isn’t for lack of wanting to, I just didn’t make the time.  Now that my birthday is done and Christmas looms, it’s time to get my act together and see if there’s something I should be doing about the garden.

Perhaps I could talk about stepping away from being the Chair of the Garden Committee after 6 years.  It’s time for an injection of new ideas and energy.  What are some of the things I accomplished, and am proud of…and perhaps a few I’d just as soon forget?

  • I brought the gardens through the major rebuilding of the West Wing.  It impacted all of our gardens in one way or another.
    • The Secret Garden was relatively unscathed…lucky them!
    • Level C & D however, were closed down for a year and a half, with construction materials stacked or built on them.IMG_3637
    • We were not allowed to go out there…so the gardens languished, and the gardeners wept!
  • I applied for, and won, a GEM Grant for the gardeners after the construction was over, so they each were given a comfortable sum of money to purchase new plant material, and also provided the transportation to get to and from the plant nursery. We went in the spring and again in the fall.  IMG_3890It produced many smiles…and beautiful gardens!
  • Following that, we needed to get people back into the gardens to show them off, and remind Horizon House, that we did indeed, have beautiful gardens.  To accomplish this, I began “June In Our Gardens”.  Every day of June had some garden related activity.  It worked! IMG_6659 Residents came to lectures, parties, walks, tours and even cooking (with our herbs-available for all residents) and lessons on how to use our new grills!
  • We continued the “June In Our Gardens”, and it is becoming an annual affair. IMG_7687 I will continue to chair that sub-committee, until either I tire of it, or they have had enough of me!!!
  • Another GEM grant was generated to get a Birdbath for each level garden, and Hummingbird Feeders to hang outside the Dining Room windows for our residents to enjoy in the winter, when the “blooming planters” have been removed.Screen Shot 2018-10-10 at 7.06.53 AM
  • We did a little “re-naming”!  The Level E Garden is now “The Secret Garden”.  That name is much more appropriate, as no one can ever find it!  Also, the garden storage area is now called “The Garden Shed”, and the new sub-committee has done a great job of cleaning it up, and keeping it that way!

I’m sure there are more…but we’ll stop here.  It’s been a great bunch of years.  I’ve loved chairing this committee.  Gardeners are fun and understanding, to say nothing of hardworking.  Thank you all for letting me stand at your helm.  It has been an honor.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Most of us are familiar with the Version 2geranium, which is formally named “Pelargonium”.   These geraniums are considered a hardy perennial, biennial or sometimes an annual, medicinal herb.  The herb is often used for aromatic oil.  (I have a hard time believing that, as I find their odor slightly offensive.)  But, that is not my purpose here today.

Today, I want to talk about the geranium with which most of us are familiar.  It is a very popular potted plant, usually associated with bright red, white or pink flowers.

In northern climes, they are considered to be an annual, although they can easily be overwintered, out of the ground.  Here in Seattle, our climate is temperate enough that they survive quite nicely in the garden. At Horizon House we can see them flowering happily, not just in garden beds, but on our balconies.

Audrey was having a few issues with yellowing leaves on her geraniums.  The plants seemed healthy otherwise, and she just removed the leaves.  That’s exactly what she should do.  Remember however, that this is a very drought tolerant plant.  It likes to be a bit dry, so over-watering can overwhelm it pretty quickly.  If the leaves on your geranium are yellowing, hold off on the water a bit.

Also, it could be that it is needing a little fertilizer.  Remember in your home-owner days when you fed your grass fertilizer high in nitrogen???  (The first number on the fertilizer bag.)  That fertilizer (nitrogen) is what kept the grass GREEN!  So, look for a fertilizer that has more nitrogen than other nutrients.  Maybe 10-5-5 or something like that.  The first number should be the highest.  Do not get too rambunctious with that fertilizer.  Less is probably better!  Here’s a link from Clemson University that tells you more than you’d probably ever want to know about fertilizers.  But you might find it interesting!  And it might just help your geranium!

Read Full Post »

Here at Horizon House, we are definitely IN an URBAN setting.  Many of our gardeners here would like to have attractive vegetables growing in their raised beds, and on our gardening terraces.

Within the city

Within the city

There are things to be cautious about with urban vegetable gardening, mostly with noxious air and also noxious things in the soil.  Everything eventually gets into the soil, so it’s worth a bit of concern.

I don’t think we need to worry as much as those who live locally, and attempt to plant veggies right at the roadside.  Here at Horizon House, we have the benefit of using packaged soil or “compost” in our gardens.  We do not just dig in local soil, as do many of our neighbors.  BUT, there is still air, and rain borne chemicals that settle down into our soil.

This morning I read an interesting article on my NPR Home page.  It talks about what Washington, D.C. is doing concerning this.  The University of the District of Columbia is supporting a study on urban farming, and is in fact, the ONLY Land Grant University that deals with a totally URBAN focus.

Mchezaji “Che” Axum is the gentleman who runs the research farm for the U. of the D. of C..  “…instead of vast fields testing dozens of varieties of wheat, Axum’s research farm has raised beds, narrow hoop houses and even a shipping container. He gives growers advice on where to buy decent soil or how to compost their own, in case the land they plan to grow on has a seedy industrial past.”

This is GOOD stuff for the urban farmers within the confines of Seattle, and even the communities close by.

HH Herb Garden

HH Herb Garden

In our Gardening Terraces, some gardeners are growing pretty greens,  little tomatoes, kale, etc.  We also have an herb garden tended by two of our Garden Committee members.

The herbs are available to ALL who live at Horizon House.  It’s wonderful to be able to come down to the garden and pick nice, fresh herbs to use in our dinners and lunches.  In fact, the Garden Committee has also sponsored an herb garden for our chef, right outside the dining room, so the menu can now boast fresh herbs in our food!

Read Full Post »

Joke for today

A NEW JOKE EVERY DAY

Liam's Travels

Not all those who wander are lost

The Sharing Gardens

A Master Gardener from Northern New England moves to the Pacific Northwest. Here are accumulated gardening experiences encountered along the way.

Hot Saucers Ultimate

Hamilton College's Ultimate Frisbee Team

This Veggie Life

A Vegetarian | Nature Lifestyle Blog

A Transplanted Gardener

A Master Gardener from Northern New England moves to the Pacific Northwest. Here are accumulated gardening experiences encountered along the way.

Karen Whalen

A Writer Sharing Her One in a Million Journey with Adrenal Cancer

Camp Merrowvista

The official blog of Merrowvista summer camp

G Chek Flys!

My Photography and Aviation Interests

Storyshucker

A blog full of humorous and poignant observations.

Wausau News

Health and Freedom News

Lyons Bonsai

A Novice Bonsai journey in Ireland

A Bridge to the Garden

Seminars for Gardeners about Gardening