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Archive for the ‘amaryllis’ Category

Prune spring flowering shrubs when they have finished blooming. IMG_6128 Be very careful with rhododendrons and azaleas, as it’s very easy to remove next years bloom.  If you can just leave them, it would probably be best.

Thin seedlings

Use balanced, organic fertilizers around flowers

Be sure to fertilize your annuals with liquid fertilizer. They’ll thank you for it by blooming continuously!

Stake tall perennials, like lilies, and Foxglove.

Are your tomatoes “caged”?  If not, get that done before it’s too late.

Use a pine needle mulch for blueberries

Be sure your lawn mower is set to cut the grass HIGH

IMG_7570Be sure to dead-head those iris, and remember the time to divide them comes next month.

Gladiolus corms can be planted-alternate their planting by two weeks or so.  That way they will bloom continuously.

Dead-head (prune off) spent flowers from plants and shrubs

Remove rhubarb seed stalks as they form.

Cutting back perennials such as dianthus, veronica and other similar shrubby varieties, will possibly produce a second blooming. How great would that be? They’ll also look better!

You can make softwood cuttings of shrubs this month through July.  Using a little rooting hormone would facilitate the process.

You may still plant container grown shrubs

Plant broccoli seed for fall harvest.

If you have a water garden, there’s still time to plant water
lilies.

House plants can be moved outside to a shady, protected spot.

These same houseplants can be lightly fed with half strength
fertilizer.

Mulch perennials and roses to keep down weeds and conserve moisture.

If you have an amaryllis, now would be the time to move it outside.

Pinch the leading stems of your chrysanthemum’s to encourage them to
be bushier and have more blossoms. Continue doing this every 6 inches
or so, as they grow.

If you have apple trees, hang red sticky-ball traps to control apple maggot flies. Small trees can get by with 2 balls. Larger trees should probably have 4-6 balls.

Stop cutting asparagus when the new spears get pinkie-finger thin. Let them grow into ferns instead. It will feed the roots.

Side-Dress veggies to give them a little boost

Have you got Hostas? IMG_7586Are there slugs chewing them? Try this solution, if you haven’t already.
Combine 9 parts water to 1 part common household ammonia and spray it on the hosta just before dark. When the slugs hit this, they will dissolve!

Are you remembering to turn the compost every once in a while? You should also wet it down if the hose is close by. Doing this will help it decompose quicker although it will eventually happen anyway!

Mow down any daffodil drifts that have “gone by”, if you haven’t already!

Order your bulbs so they arrive in time to plant in the autumn.

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At Christmas we went to our daughter’s home.  She had this amaryllis blooming on her table in the living room.  Like so many of us, a little guidance on how to care for this gorgeous plant would be helpful.  I will attempt to do that here.  I will give you the “simple” guide, but I will provide you with some links that will go into much greater detail, so you can go as deeply into this as you’d like…or stop at the simplest!

I am going to assume you were given a blooming amaryllis bulb and it is beginning to fade.  Your question now is probably, “What now?”

You can just treat it like any other houseplant in order to have it bloom again next year. BUT, there are a few things you need to do.  As soon as the flower has faded, cut the flower stalk off a bit above the bulb-maybe an inch or two.  DO NOT CUT OFF THE LEAVES.  The leaves are needed to replenish the bulb with all the nutrients it utilizes to re-bloom next year!  On the photograph of Christa’s blooming amaryllis, you’ll notice there are no leaves, or at least just a tiny one.  (After you cut back the flower stalk, leaves will miraculously appear.  Just let them grow until they fade as well!)

Place the pot near a sunny window, water and fertilize in the same manner you do with your other houseplants.  Then, when all danger of frost is gone, sink the pot in an east or west facing spot in your garden.

As the leaves begin to turn yellow during the progressing season, cut back on any watering until the soil drys out and the leaves fade totally.  At that time, your bulb is dormant and you can bring it back inside.  If you have a cool spot (about 45*-55*f.) allow it to stay there for a couple of months.  At that point, you can water it and set it back on your sunny windowsill and treat it the same as your other plants.

I promised you a couple of sites that would give you more in-depth direction and information.  Here are two.  One is from the University of Minnesota Extension and the other is from Iowa State University.

Here is a past Post from my New Hampshire Blog about how I dealt with Amaryllis there.  It’s from a different climate and zone, so you may get a chuckle out of seeing the differences!  Enjoy!

TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2005

Amaryllis, indoor

My amaryllis has finished it’s blooming. Those bright, vibrant red blooms were a delight on the window sill in our northern climate. The Easter Cactus blooming right next to it was the same color. What a joy!
All things must end, however, so it faded and I cut the stem off just above the neck of the bulb. Strangly enough the bulb never put forth any leaves. NOW that the bloom is gone, however, the leaves are making an appearance. There are 4 or 5 of them popping up from the bulb.
I will now put the plant downstairs in the cooler basement and cut back a bit on the watering. Fertilization will not happen again until the weather is a bit warmer, and it goes outside.
I do not have an outdoor cold frame, so I’ll have to find a sheltered spot out in the garden when the frost is no longer a problem. In this northern climate, we joke that the “no frost dates” are from July 4th until Labor Day!
Anyway, it will be coddled until it goes outside and then I’ll put it in my chicken-wire box where it will be safe from critters, but able to enjoy the great outdoors. In the fall the reverse process will happen. I’ll stop the water again, bring the pot back inside, checking for insects, etc. It will stay in the basement while the foliage dies back. At that point (January or February), I’ll clean off the old foliage and dried scales, as well as take out about an inch of soil from around the bulb (gently) and add some rich soil and compost.
Amaryllis bulbs do best if pot-bound, so don’t be too quick to use a larger pot. Give them 2-4 years before this kind of a change.

 

 

 

 

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AMARYLLIS OR LILY?

The other evening, sitting with other HH residents during Sunny Monday, and while enjoying the D Level Garden, someone commented on a pink cluster of blooms, up on the C level.  Are they lilies or an amaryllis?

From that distance, my guess was lilies, others thought amaryllis.  I thought the best way to find out was to go and take a closer look.  We could also ask the gardener IMG_6290who has it in her garden!  So, I did both!

The gardener is Jane, whose photo I took in the spring, sitting in her garden. Her comment was that it was something she “inherited” when she took over the garden, so she really wasn’t sure WHAT it was!

When I looked at it, it was obviously an amaryllis.  How did I know?  An amaryllis has a straight stalk with strap like leaves coming up directly from the bulb.  A lily has short leaves, growing out from the stalk all the way from the bulb to the flower.

I took some photos of the pink amaryllis from the vantage point we had the other evening,

as well as a few close-ups where you can see it has a straight, leafless stalk from bulb to flower. IMG_6841 It is pretty much done blooming, but it sure was pretty when it was in it’s prime!IMG_6833 (1)

 

 

 

 

 

I also took some photos of lily plants.  They are done blooming and the blooms have been removed, but you can see the difference in the leaves on the stems.

Here is a link that will give you a better explanation about the differences between the amaryllis and lily.

Last week my post was about “dead-heading”.  The gardeners took my lead, and were busy trimming back those dead flower heads.  Someone suggested I post some pictures taken THIS week…when everything looks great.  So, here they are!

 

 

 

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