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Archive for October, 2018

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It’s a question I often hear, and often answer as simply as I can, usually after asking a few questions.

  1. Is it an orchid that has just decided it doesn’t want to bloom in the next year or two???  (and you don’t care to wait!)
  2. Whatever kind of plant it is, is there anyone you know who might want to adopt your plant?
  3. Is the plant diseased or buggy?
  4. Are you willing to WORK on it, or are you DONE with it?

After we talk about those possibilities, we then go on to a possible solution.

#1-There are a few people here at Horizon House who will “adopt” spent orchids and bring them back to flower. What they do with them at that point is unknown!

#2-Would a neighbor, or family member like to have it?

#3-If it is diseased or buggy, it should go “down the shoot” into the garbage.  Put it in a plastic (or paper) bag and into the garbage.  It is neither recyclable, NOR compostable.

#4-If it’s just beyond your interest or appears to be dying a natural death, or you can’t find an adoptive “parent” for it, here’s what you can do.

If the plant is small, and in fairly good condition, put it on the shelf in the Service Room.  Perhaps someone on your floor will take a liking to it.  OR maybe the person who empties the trash may know someone who would like it.

If no one takes it…or it’s beyond help…

Allow the plant to dry out.  Take a large, PAPER grocery bag, dump the plant (with it’s soil) into the bag WITHOUT the pot.  Close up the bag and put it (carefully sealed) in the compost container in the Service Room on your floor.  If it is too large for that, bring it to the Potting Room on B-2 and put the bag into the compost container there.

Just so you know, this is perfect compost!  It is living (or having once been alive) material.  compost-handSoil is exactly what compost will become, and is a needed part of the composting process.

The pot remaining, if you don’t have a use for it, can be washed out, and put into the recycling bin.  If it’s a pretty one, consider Monday Market!

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I hope this answers your questions.  Happy Gardening, inside or outside!!!

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Yesterday the Garden Committee sponsored a trip to Swanson’s, a local Plant Nursery.  My garden is full and my window sills are groaning with indoor plants, however, I was not lost for what to do as I prowled the aisles at Swanson’s.

I was looking for some Hummingbird Feeders to put outside the Dining Room windows here at Horizon House.

We have just removed the flowering planters that were such a colorful delight all summer long.  We needed something that might provide some enjoyment for our diners.  Why not a Hummingbird Feeder or two?Screen Shot 2018-10-10 at 7.06.53 AM

We decided on two.  One on each side of the dining room.  Hummers are pretty territorial, so we wanted to be sure they could all eat in peace…so one per side!

I am sure the Garden Committee will get some comments soon!  I don’t think the feeders have been “discovered” yet.  I noticed when we went for dinner last evening, that I should readjust the placement of one of them, so it’s a bit more visible to all the diners.

The Garden Committee decided rather than have gardeners “take turns” tending the feeders, that perhaps having them be “adopted” might work better.  Already one of them has been adopted by Carol O.  I think I will adopt the other one, since I’m about to give up my chairmanship of the Garden Committee.  I’ll be looking for some “fun” endeavor to accomplish instead!  The feeders will hang until it’s time for the flowering baskets to re-appear in the spring. IMG_8277 At that point they will be removed allowing the flowering planters to provide nectar for our hummers.  We’ll hold off on the feeding until the planters come down again!

Here in the Pacific Northwest, Anna’s Hummingbirds remain all winter.  There are few blossoms for them as the weather cools down, so feeding them should encourage them to stick around OUR dining room!  Wish us luck!

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